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Biological Invasions - Special Issue 2017

A proposed national strategic framework for the management of Cactaceae in South Africa

Haylee Kaplan, John R.U. Wilson, Hildegard Klein, Lesley Henderson, Helmuth G. Zimmermann, Phetole Manyama, Philip Ivey, David M. Richardson, Ana Novoa

Bothalia; Vol 47, No 2 (2017), 12 pages. doi: 10.4102/abc.v47i2.2149

Submitted: 07 August 2016
Published:  31 March 2017

Abstract

Background: South Africa has a long history of managing biological invasions. The rapid increase in the scale and complexity of problems associated with invasions calls for new, more strategic management approaches. This paper explores strategic management approaches for cactus invasions in South Africa. Cacti (Cactaceae) have had a long history of socio-economic benefits, considerable negative environmental and socio-economic impacts, and a wide range of management interventions in South Africa.
Objectives: To guide the future management of cactus invasions, a national strategic framework was developed by the South African Cactus Working Group. The overarching aim of this framework is to reduce the negative impacts of cacti to a point where their benefits significantly outweigh the losses.
Method: Four strategic objectives were proposed: (1) all invasive and potentially invasive cactus species should be prevented from entering the country, (2) new incursions of cactus species must be rapidly detected and eradicated, (3) the impacts of invasive cacti must be reduced and contained and (4) socio-economically useful cacti (both invasive and non-invasive species) must be utilised sustainably to minimise the risk of further negative impacts.
Results: There are currently 35 listed invasive cactus species in the country; 10 species are targeted for eradication and 12 are under partial or complete biological control. We discuss approaches for the management of cactus species, their introduction and spread pathways and spatial prioritisation of control efforts.
Conclusion: A thorough understanding of context-specific invasion processes and stakeholder support is needed when implementing strategies for a group of invasive species.

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Author affiliations

Haylee Kaplan, Invasive Species Programme, South African National Biodiversity Institute, Kirstenbosch Research Centre, South Africa
John R.U. Wilson, Invasive Species Programme, South African National Biodiversity Institute, Kirstenbosch Research Centre; Centre for Invasion Biology, Department of Botany and Zoology, Stellenbosch University, South Africa
Hildegard Klein, Agricultural Research Council – Plant Protection Research Institute, South Africa
Lesley Henderson, Agricultural Research Council – Plant Protection Research Institute, South Africa
Helmuth G. Zimmermann, Helmuth Zimmermann & Associates, South Africa
Phetole Manyama, Invasive Species Programme, South African National Biodiversity Institute, Kirstenbosch Research Centre, South Africa
Philip Ivey, Invasive Species Programme, South African National Biodiversity Institute, Kirstenbosch Research Centre, South Africa
David M. Richardson, Centre for Invasion Biology, Department of Botany and Zoology, Stellenbosch University, South Africa
Ana Novoa, Invasive Species Programme, South African National Biodiversity Institute, Kirstenbosch Research Centre; Centre for Invasion Biology, Department of Botany and Zoology, Stellenbosch University, South Africa

Keywords

Biological invasions; Cactus; Invasive alien species; Impacts and benefits; Pathways; Stakeholders; Strategic management

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2. Managing conflict-generating invasive species in South Africa: Challenges and trade-offs
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doi: 10.4102/abc.v47i2.2160

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ISSN: 0006-8241 (print) | ISSN: 2311-9284 (online)

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